Coca Cola ad: Typography Reverse Engineering

The Coca-Cola slogan from 2009 to 2016

I will be reverse engineering the typography from this Coca-Cola ad. This ad campaign ran from 2009 to 2016. Out of all the ads I found via the Internet, this one stood out to me the most. Much like last week’s post, this Coca-Cola ad has a very simplistic design, but still contains a powerful message due to its imagery.

I found this image on another blog. This is the link to that blog image talking about ads: https://currentconflicts.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/advertising/

Typeface #1: Spencerian Script

Script Typeface

The Coca-Cola logo was invented by Frank Mason Robinson in 1885. The font he used was a script font known as Spencerian script. It font style was very popular in the United States from 1850 to 1925. To this day, Coca-Cola continues to use the Spencerian script for their logo considering how recognizable it is. A script font is a font that appears to have been handwritten with the use of a calligraphy pen or brush.

Typeface #2: Sans serif

Sans serif Typeface

The second typeface on this image is called Sans serif. The Sans serif font used in this ad is thought to be the Gotham Book font which was designed by Tobias Frere-Jones in 2000. It is a Sans serif due to the lack of serifs in the font. It also lacks thick/thin transitions. They are called “monoweight” fonts because the font has the same thickness from beginning to end.

Contrast

There are many elements of contrast in this advertisement. There is a noticeable difference in size between the two fonts. My eyes are immediately driven towards the Coca-Cola logo, due to its typeface and size. It really sticks out in the image also in part to its placement within the ad. There appears to be some weight in both fonts, but the Spencerian font has a heavier weight to it thanks to its boldness.

Because the two fonts are different typefaces, they vastly differ in structure. As mentioned earlier, the Coca-Cola logo is a script typeface, and due to its structure, it contains a noticeable shift weight. The monoweight-like nature of the words “open happiness” don’t have the same transitions as the script font does in the ad. They both standout from each other and it helps you know what you’re looking at.

Conclusion

I think that the principles mentioned above do a great job with the overall design of the ad. The Coca-Cola logo stands because of the typeface that is used. Your eyes rest on the logo and then the rest of the bottle. The words “open happiness” don’t conflict with the imagery of the ad due to its contrast. It is very different from the rest of the ad, but not in a way that takes away from the ad itself because of the contrast.

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